Analysis of the machine that won

Two men, Swift and Henderson, are debating over who really won the war for Earth: Henderson says that he had been unable to make sure that he was receiving more reliable data.

While the people hailed the computer,the two really knew who the heroes were. Two men, Swift and Henderson, are debating over who really won the war for Earth: The Machine That Won the War, by Isaac Asimov, is a story that teaches a valuable lesson about humanity and also has an ironic twist at the end.

This foreshadowing helps the reader to see that someone is going to have to act upon Henderson s faults if the war is to be won. Finally, Lamar Swift, Executive Director of the Solar Federation, reveals that he had not trusted the reports produced by Multivac, and had made the final decisions purely on the toss of a coin, which was not very smart, even though it worked.

All three men, then, had played crucial roles in the successful war effort. Therefore, Henderson now confesses, in supplying data to Multivac, The entire section is words. He stated that ever since the beginning of the war, he had been hiding a secret.

In conclusion, The Machine That Won the War, taught us all a valuable lesson about how humans think, and contained a humorous, ironic ending which stunned or should have stunned everyone. Henderson explained the fact that Multivac was nothing more than a large machine, only capable of doing what it was programmed to do.

Swift wonders if Jablonski is jealous of the credit the machine is being given by the population of earth. Swift, the military commander, received these battle plans that Henderson had printed out on the front the front being the battle front.

This conflict, making these tough decisions, helps influence the climax. Plot summary[ edit ] Three influential leaders of the human race meet in the aftermath of a successful war against the Denebians.

Henderson comments that the machine was not superior to the input it received—input, Jablonski is quick to note, that Henderson had provided. Swift gives the credit to Multivac as he glances at Max Jablonski, who has worked closely with the machine.

Analysis of Isaac Asimov’s, “The Machine That Won The War”

Alfred Prufrock constantly lived in fear, in fear of life and death. However, the final irony of the story appears when Lamar Smith, the man who had to make the final decisions, surprisingly revealed that he had always distrusted the reports from Multivax and had not taken them very much into account when choosing how to prosecute the war effort.

Log in or register now. This use of situation[al] irony shows us that in the worst imaginable scenario, the outcome is actually made so simply. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed.

Waste no more time! Lamar Smith had served as Executive of the Solar Federation and was thus the leader of the war effort.

It was at this point, however, that Jablonski revealed yet another irony: Jablonski, in fact, in interpreting the output of Multivax, had been forced to do what Henderson had done when supplying the input: John Henderson, as chief programmer of the enormous computer, had provided the data that Multivac had so importantly analyzed.

These were the data he was expected to feed into Multivac. It is all free! While the people hailed the computer, the two really knew who the heroes were. He, realizing that some of these plans were outrageous, had to act upon a different form of machine.

It was the fact that some of its Multivac s data might have been unreliable. This conflict, as you will note later, helped win the war.

Making this fact public would have destroyed morale on earth, since all hopes had been pinned on the intelligence of this unique machine. Human intuition had played a far more crucial role in the success of the war effort that anyone could have imagined.

I even had the Multivac Annex prepare data for me according to a private programming pattern I had devised for the purpose. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources.

Lower-level officials, for instance, had supplied information intended to make them look good.Analysis of the Machine That Won the War Essay "The Machine That Won the War," by Isaac Asimov, is a story that teaches a valuable lesson about humanity and also has an ironic twist at the end.

What is ironic about Isaac Asimov's story

The Machine That Won the War, by Isaac Asimov, is a story that teaches a valuable lesson about humanity and also has an ironic twist at the end. The setting is the future of Earth, and a great war had just been won against an enemy race. "The Machine That Won the War" is a science fiction short story by Isaac Asimov.

The story first appeared in the October issue of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, and was reprinted in the collections Nightfall Preceded by: Anniversary.

“The Machine That Won the War,” by Isaac Asimov, is a story that teaches a valuable lesson about humanity and also has an ironic twist at the end. The setting is the future of Earth, and a great war had just been won against an enemy race.

Issac Asimov’s story “The Machine that Won the War” is ironic on a number of different levels and in a number of different ways. The story reports a conversation among three men who had been. Free term papers & essays - Analysis of Isaav Asimovs The Machine That Won The War, S.

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Analysis of the machine that won
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